Music. History.

robinmarohn:

Gene Krupa (January 15, 1909 – October 16, 1973) having a good time.

Now you know why Moon the Loon called him the greatest of all time.

I think the ‘World Music’ is a label that doesn’t fit anyone. I don’t feel very comfortable with that label. People have already an idea of what world music is. I may be completely wrong, but when I hear ‘world music’ that’s what I have in mind—music from some tribes anywhere in the world or very small groups of people doing their thing. That’s what I understand by ‘world music.’ And I don’t think it’s a good label for anyone, because sounds that are made with similar instruments in different parts of the world sound totally different. It’s like the label of ‘folk.’ Sometimes I get labeled as a folk musician because I’m playing with an acoustic guitar. If I played exactly the same music with an electric guitar, then there would be no room for me in folk. Sometimes it’s necessary to label music in order to help people to know what it is. But honestly, I think that confuses them rather than help them to know what’s about. I’m talking about everyone, not only what I do.

Juana Molina on music genres (interviewed by Araceli Cruz for The Village Voice, 2008)

Juana and genres… that is a complicated theme. What kind of music does she play? As she said, World music can’t fit anyone, because it’s so vague and makes artists look like exotic species from Narnia. Let’s not even talk about Latin as a genre – as a geographical reference it’s of course acceptable. But what about Folk? That seems to fit her sometimes, especially if we consider Argentine folkloric music. I actually think that when she complains about being tagged as electro-folk, is against the  idea of folk as “anything that involves an acoustic guitar”, but she sometimes recognizes the folklore – “Zamba corta” is the clearest example, but notice also all the nature that her music encloses.

But what happens now that she plays electric guitar? Does the folklore still fit her? Does it go beyond the instruments? Sometimes I can feel the folklore in Wed21, but to say the truth, I don’t know if it’s really there or if  it’s just my ignorance. 

(via oneweekoneband)

The iPod, like the Walkman cassette player before it, allows us to listen to our music wherever we want. Previously, recording technology had unlinked music from the concert hall, the café, and the saloon, but now music can always be carried with us. Michael Bull, who has written frequently about the impact of the Walkman and the iPod, points out that we often use devices to ‘aestheticize urban space.’ We carry our own soundtrack with us wherever we go, and the world around us is overlaid with our music. Our whole life becomes a movie, and we can alter the score for it over and over again: one minute it’s a tragedy, and the next it’s an action film. Energetic, dreamy, or ominous and dark: everyone has their own private movie going on in their heads, and no two are the same….Theodor Adorno… called this situation ‘accompanied solitude,’ a situation where we might be alone, but we have the ability via music to create the illusion that we are not.
from How Music Works, by David Byrne (via girlfromtralfamadore)
893thecurrent:

Jackson Five fanatics rejoice—on Oct. 28, Minneapolis label Secret Stash Records will release the clan’s long-lost first recording of “Big Boy” circa 1967. The rare 45 RPM will be part of an elaborate anthology of soul, funk, and gospel tracks recorded for Chicago’s One-derful! Records between its founding in 1962 and 1971.
read more

893thecurrent:

Jackson Five fanatics rejoice—on Oct. 28, Minneapolis label Secret Stash Records will release the clan’s long-lost first recording of “Big Boy” circa 1967. The rare 45 RPM will be part of an elaborate anthology of soul, funk, and gospel tracks recorded for Chicago’s One-derful! Records between its founding in 1962 and 1971.

read more

okayafrica:

GALLERY: The Iconic Album Art of Ghariokwu Lemi

Nigerian graphic designer, fine artist and illustrator Ghariokwu Lemi occupies a unique position as the creative genius behind twenty-six of Fela‘s iconic album covers. Christened ‘The Artist’ by Kuti himself, the vivid social realism of Lemi’s works created between 1974 and 1993 provided a fitting visual accompaniment to the singer’s derisive anti-establishment lyrics with its cross of distorted collage, illustration and caricature.

Read More

rollingstone:

A group of Swedish scientists are competing to hide the most Bob Dylan lyrics in scholarly articles.

nedison:

Beautiful! And really interesting to hear George talking with the Indian musicians.

893thecurrent:

In a feature just published today, Rolling Stone declares 2014 the 30th anniversary of “pop’s greatest year.” 1984 was “1984 was the year that pop stood tallest,” according to several collaborators on a feature listing the 100 greatest songs of that year. And who stood tallest in 1984?
Well, Madonna was pretty good—her “Borderline” comes in at #2. Michael Jackson? Yeah, “Thriller” merits a #4 slot. But the artist who towered over this “greatest year” in pop history, says Rolling Stone, was Prince. Tracks from Purple Rain occupy three out of the list’s top ten slots, coming in at #1 (“When Doves Cry”), #4 (“Let’s Go Crazy”), and #8 (“Purple Rain”).
Perhaps even more incredible is how the list evidences Prince’s wide-ranging influence.

893thecurrent:

In a feature just published today, Rolling Stone declares 2014 the 30th anniversary of “pop’s greatest year.” 1984 was “1984 was the year that pop stood tallest,” according to several collaborators on a feature listing the 100 greatest songs of that year. And who stood tallest in 1984?

Well, Madonna was pretty good—her “Borderline” comes in at #2. Michael Jackson? Yeah, “Thriller” merits a #4 slot. But the artist who towered over this “greatest year” in pop history, says Rolling Stone, was Prince. Tracks from Purple Rain occupy three out of the list’s top ten slots, coming in at #1 (“When Doves Cry”), #4 (“Let’s Go Crazy”), and #8 (“Purple Rain”).

Perhaps even more incredible is how the list evidences Prince’s wide-ranging influence.

nedison:

thebluegrasssituation:

Our review of Amanda Petrusich’s excellent book on the hunt for rare 78 rpm vinyl records. Read it here.

Now reading.

Let me know what you think, nedison (and followers). It sounds fascinating.  
design-is-fine:

Sony, Record player Flamingo PS-F9, 1982. Via Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich.

design-is-fine:

Sony, Record player Flamingo PS-F9, 1982. Via Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich.